Essay Prize S

Essay Prize S-37
The papers had to:: Grace’s paper employs twenty-one sources and two figures; their quality and diversity—from academic journals and newspaper articles to the Neil Young song that she uses as her essay’s title—speak to both her mastery of the research process and the depth of her engagement with the course.The technical merits of Grace’s writing are also praise-worthy; her tone is academic without being inaccessible, and conveys the dramatic nature of the opioid crisis without resorting to purple prose.

The papers had to:: Grace’s paper employs twenty-one sources and two figures; their quality and diversity—from academic journals and newspaper articles to the Neil Young song that she uses as her essay’s title—speak to both her mastery of the research process and the depth of her engagement with the course.The technical merits of Grace’s writing are also praise-worthy; her tone is academic without being inaccessible, and conveys the dramatic nature of the opioid crisis without resorting to purple prose.

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: Students were asked to write a thesis-driven essay based on research in some aspect of art, literature, and/or popular culture.

They were urged, especially, to engage with the course’s main focus on distinctions between “high” and “low” art, culture, and entertainment: how these determinations are arrived at, how they change over time, who gets to decide, what voices get excluded, etc. B.: As part of their engagement with high and low culture, students were required to incorporate a diverse range of sources—including “high” (peer-reviewed), “middle” (e.g., journalistic), and “low” (reddit, Amazon reviews, etc.).: I like this essay because, apart from being very nicely written, it also chooses an admirably focused topic—the contrasting historical popularities of Emily Dickinson and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow—and uses that focus to draw broader conclusions about how social contexts shape the reception of literature.

Examples of such questions included: How have prevailing scientific beliefs about male and female anatomy affected the struggles of a specific female scientist?

What were/are the cultural, political, and scientific factors that facilitated (or are currently facilitating) the shift from one scientific paradigm of gender beliefs to another?

While these essays each have a unique perspective, they share several hallmarks of successful academic writing: they make claims about relevant and debatable issues, support those claims with evidence from sources as well as their own experiences, and develop clear and compelling arguments based in reasoning and logic.

Readers looking for effective models of persuasive writing and close readings will profit from these pieces.

He argues for his proposed solution by providing evidence on how it can succeed and also addresses possible opposing viewpoints.

Lastly, Katherine Steinberg’s “Translation in Paradise” is a close reading of the novel “Paradise” and the use of translation within the text.

Readers will find that these essays contribute to larger conversations about our culture and how our social constructs have an impact on diverse groups of people living within our society.

Erin Camia’s persuasive essay, a commentary on the social implications of “RBF,” explores the use of the controversial term “resting bitch face” to make several eye-opening statements about how women’s anger is perceived by society and the stereotypes that complicate women’s lives as a result.

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