How To Write A Business Continuity Plan

How To Write A Business Continuity Plan-43
The most frequent examples of cyber attacks include phishing emails (which are designed to steal information), brute-force attacks (in which crooks use automated software to crack an employee’s password) and ransomware (which locks down an organisation’s system until a fee is paid).

The most frequent examples of cyber attacks include phishing emails (which are designed to steal information), brute-force attacks (in which crooks use automated software to crack an employee’s password) and ransomware (which locks down an organisation’s system until a fee is paid).

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If a sewage line is broken, the sanitary risk (not to mention the smell) could force the organisation to send its employees home. Systems crash, files are lost and documents go missing.

The whys of technological failures are so manifold and unpredictable that it’s impossible to anticipate how or when they will occur – just consider them an ever-present risk that will materialise at some point, so be ready for when they occur.

However, natural disasters also include snowstorms, heavy wind and floods, which are less dependent on geography but can still disrupt business, and which you should therefore plan for.

Your main concern in this category should be events that damage or disrupt transport routes, like car accidents and train crashes.

Organisations’ networks and the applications used will contain dozens of vulnerabilities that crooks are always looking to exploit.

The most obvious reason to implement a BCP is to ensure that your organisation remains productive in the event of a disruption.It’s primarily concerned with critical activities that, if disrupted, could immediately jeopardise your productivity or the availability of your services.In that regard, it simply considers IT a critical resource for preserving those activities – in other words, a dependency.Network connections, online systems, phone lines, network drives, servers and business applications are all vulnerable to a range of disruptions and can cause huge headaches if they are compromised.But business continuity planning isn’t about recovering IT.Electrical fires and burst pipes can cause huge problems for organisations and are liable to occur at any time.A fire or flood could damage expensive equipment or require a room to be vacated.An organisation’s staff is often its biggest security weakness.Employees will lose or accidentally expose data from time to time, and although staff awareness training will reduce the risk, it won’t eradicate the threat.Humans inevitably make mistakes, and you need to be aware of that when planning for disruptions. This typically happens if they are disgruntled at work (maybe they were turned down for a promotion) or have left the organisation acrimoniously and their login credentials are still active.There’s also the possibility that staff will simply be lured by the financial gain from stealing sensitive information and selling it on the dark web.

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