Less Homework Quotes

Less Homework Quotes-50
Rhonda Lochiatto, a 16-year teaching veteran who currently teaches fourth grade in Volusia County, Florida, came up with a unique homework policy after she realized as a parent herself how little time there is for homework once you factor in after-school activities and life in general."I don't require homework.In my class, I see homework as my opportunity to provide guidance to parents and offer ways for them to help their children at home," said the mom of two, who gives her students a "suggestion calendar" with optional interactive activities such as read-aloud time and topics to discuss.Allie Eleuther, a single mom of two in Hilton Head, South Carolina, said it has been proven there is little value in homework.

Beheadings, rebellions, thousand-year wars, incest on the royal throne, electricity, art, opera, dogs in outer space.” ― “Is this your holiday homework? It was suggested that I was a bright child who just didn’t apply himself.

Most of the time I received only “C” grades, although they should have been at least “B ” and perhaps by showing just a bit more effort I could have been an “A” student or better.

"Our schools need to embed intervention time at the end of each day to support the learning of that day and ensure conceptual understanding before new learning is added the next day."Rachel Dueker, now a college sophomore in Ottawa, Kansas, says she benefited from a high school seminar class at the end of the day where she could do her homework in school -- a tremendous stress reliever."I always did my math homework during my seminar class and went to my math teacher and sat side by side with her and got that help, and I didn't have to put in any extra time.

It was given to me," Dueker said during an interview.

Ask parents how they feel about homework, as we did on CNN's Facebook page, and the response is immediate and intense.

So many parents from all over the country sounded off passionately, saying we expect too much, too little or the wrong things from young students.It chronicles her dealings with her children's school and school district to limit the amount of homework."I feel that, especially in elementary school, spending six to seven hours a day in school is enough," said Morguess in an interview via e-mail. "Making it less and less and less is contributing to us being less competitive worldwide."Gunty's kids, who attend a school that runs from grade 5 through 12, get between one to two hours of homework, including 30 math problems every night, which she feels is appropriate, beneficial (her kids' school enjoys high test scores and strong college placement) and not intrusive on their ability to still be kids or enjoy family time."Kids are tired after that and need to unwind and engage in nonacademic activities -- many of which are just as valuable in creating a well-rounded person as academics are.""The concept of homework is so ingrained in our culture that people can't and won't think about what it might be like if we just stopped making our kids do homework," said Morguess. Mozart Saint Cyr, a father or two in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, takes it bit further: He doesn't think kids today get enough homework and are so distracted by video games and social media that they're going downhill.Her orders were that I do at least one page of homework for every one of my subjects before she came home.It didn’t matter what my teachers would assign, those were her rules and I didn’t dare to violate them!As children go back to school and parents negotiate balancing family time and take-home assignments, parents shared that their children are stressed out and exhausted by the volume of homework they receive (so, too, are parents who say they've had to become drill sergeants in their own home to get it all done).Other parents said their kids aren't getting enough or any homework at all and they've had to create their own to keep their kids challenged.Punishing me also didn’t work, and boxing my ears only made me more rebellious.It must have seemed futile to my parents, but they continued doing what they thought was right.However, I usually allowed others to make the rules and then decide whether I would follow them.Turning on our small Bakelite radio, I would ignore my mother’s rules and listen to my favorite adventure shows.“Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy, Superman, who could leap tall buildings in a single bound, and Tom Mix were my favorite daily half-hour radio programs during the week.

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