Literature Review On Health Care

Literature Review On Health Care-61
The third section surveys the scientific research relevant to staff outcomes, such as injuries, stress, work effectiveness, and satisfaction. Although these outcomes were also discussed in the 2004 report, this new study has substantially expanded the scale of most sections. Job stress and burnout in acute and nonacute pe- diatric nurses. Methods: Research teams conducted a new and more exhaustive search for rigorous empirical studies that link the design of hospital physical environ- ments with healthcare outcomes.

The third section surveys the scientific research relevant to staff outcomes, such as injuries, stress, work effectiveness, and satisfaction. Although these outcomes were also discussed in the 2004 report, this new study has substantially expanded the scale of most sections. Job stress and burnout in acute and nonacute pe- diatric nurses. Methods: Research teams conducted a new and more exhaustive search for rigorous empirical studies that link the design of hospital physical environ- ments with healthcare outcomes.

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Kaiser Permanente and its partners in the Global Health and Safety Initiative are using EBD as a strategy to increase triple safety for pa- tients, staff, and the environment.

The Global Health and Safety Initiative comprises partners that provide over 100,000 hospital beds.

Hospital-acquired infections and medical errors are among the leading causes of death in the United States, each killing more people than automobile accidents, breast cancer, or acquired immune deficiency syn- drome (AIDS) (Institute of Medicine [IOM], 2001; Klevens, et al., 2007a). According to the IOM (2001) in its landmark Crossing the Quality Chasm report: “The frustration levels of both patients and clini- cians have probably never been higher. Health care today harms too frequently and routinely fails to deliver its potential benefits” (p. At the same time, a major boom in hospital construction is occurring in the United States and several other countries. As a result, the United States will spend more than $180 billion for new hospitals in the next 5 years alone, and healthcare construction is projected to exceed $70 billion per year by 2011 (Jones, 2007). Paper presented at the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association.

These new hospitals will remain in place for decades. Job satisfaction among nursing staff in a military health care facil- ity.

The review followed a two-step process, including an extensive search for existing literature and a screening of each identified study for the relevance and quality of evidence.

Results: This review found a growing body of rigorous studies to guide healthcare design, especially with respect to reducing the frequency of hospital-acquired infections. Contamination of patients’ files in intensive care units: An indication of strict hand washing after entering case notes. Results are organized according to three gen- eral types of outcomes: patient safety, other patient outcomes, and staff outcomes. American Journal of Infection Control, 33(7), 398–401. The findings further support the importance of improving out- comes for a range of design characteristics or interventions, including single-bed rooms rather than multibed rooms, effective ventilation sys- tems, a good acoustic environment, nature distractions and daylight, ap- propriate lighting, better ergonomic design, acuity-adaptable rooms, and improved floor layouts and work settings. In the second stage, we screened all identified references using two criteria: First, the study should be empirically based and examine the influence of environmental characteristics on patient, family, or staff outcomes. Second, the quality of each study was evaluated in terms of its research design and methods and whether the journal was peer-reviewe D. Emergency department patient perceptions of privacy and confidentiality. The evidence indicates that well-designed phys- ical settings play an important role in making hospi- tals safer and more healing for patients and better places for staff to work. healthcare not only negatively influence patients; they affect staff. Bacterial contamination of curtains in clinical areas. Key Words: Evidence-based design, hospital design, healthcare design, healthcare quality, outcomes, pa- tient safety, staff safety, infection, hand washing, med- ical errors, falls, pain, sleep, stress, depression, con- fidentiality, social support, satisfaction, single rooms, noise, nature, daylight Background A visit to a U. hospital is dangerous and stressful for patients, families, and staff. hospitals is estimated to be billion for hospital-acquired infections (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2000) and to billion for medical errors (Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 1999). Registered nurses have a turnover rate av- eraging 20% (Joint Commission, 2002). healthcare system is facing the confluence of the need to replace aging 1970s hospitals, population shifts, the graying of the Baby Boom generation, and the introduc- tion of new medical technologies. A case study of way- finding and security in a Mexico City hospital. This once-in-a-lifetime construction program provides an opportunity to rethink hospital design and especially to consider how better design can improve patient and staff outcomes. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in neutropenic patients during hospital construction: Before and after chemoprophylaxis and institution of HEPA filters. O’Rourke, K., Allgood, C., Van Derslice, J., & Hardy, M. Just as medicine has increasingly moved toward evidence-based medicine where clinical choices are informed by research, healthcare design is increasingly guided by rigorous research linking hospitals’ physical environments to healthcare outcomes, and it is moving toward evidence-based design (EBD) (Hamilton, 2003). First, we conducted key word searches to identify potentially relevant studies published in English. Thirty-two key words were used, referring to patient and staff outcomes (such as infection, medical error, pain, sleep, de- pression, stress, and privacy), physical environmental factors (hospital, hospital units, healthcare facility, etc.), and other healthcare-related issues (such as patient and family-centered care).

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