Oedipus And Aristotle Essay

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Oedipus fits this precisely, for his basic flaw is his lack of knowledge about his own identity.

Moreover, no amount of foresight or preemptive action could remedy Oedipus' hamartia; unlike other tragic heroes, Oedipus bears no responsibility for his flaw.

Oedipus fulfills the three parameters that define the tragic hero.

His dynamic and multifaceted character emotionally bonds the audience; his tragic flaw forces the audience to fear for him, without losing any respect; and his horrific punishment elicits a great sense of pity from the audience.

Thus, Oedipus' nobility derives from many and diverse sources, and the audience develops a great respect and emotional attachment to him.

The complex nature of Oedipus' "hamartia," is also important.

Second, Oedipus himself and the Chorus both note that Oedipus will continue after the tragedy's conclusion.

Unlike, for example Agamemnon, Clytemnestra, and Orestes (the heroes in the Orestia trilogy), Oedipus' suffering does not end with the play; even so, the conclusion also presents a sense of closure to the play.

Clearly, for Aristotle's theory to work, the tragic hero must be a complex and well-constructed character, as in Sophocles' Oedipus the King.

As a tragic hero, Oedipus elicits the three needed responses from the audience far better than most; indeed, Aristotle and subsequent critics have labeled Oedipus the ideal tragic hero.

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